A blog about games, gamers, and various and sundry geek culture-related ephemera and paraphernalia.

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Scanning Project: Map of Aerth

Okay, this map only partially belongs in the scanning project.

Allow me to clarify: Although the map you see here is direct from Photoshop, the basis for the map was hand-drawn on construction paper and scanned. Thus, this map is a hybrid of hand-drawn and digital work.

Long-time readers of the Rust Monster blog (or those who have delved far enough back in the archives) might recognize this map: although created sometime around 2000 or 2001, it was later transformed into the map that became the second post to this blog.

Here's that newer version, reposted here for those who are interested:

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8 comments:

  1. Fantasy world building is a guilty little pleasure/hobby of mine (as I suspect it is with a lot of gamers). Its fun to see someone else's creation—and even more fun to see the Kingdoms of Durnin and Zenon! Classics from the Dark Tower Game! I see I'm not the only one who got those names stuck in his head ;)

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  2. The updated one is gorgeous, Chris.

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  3. @rologutwein: Yeah, I'm an unabashed Dark Tower fan-boy. :P

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  4. @Timeshadows: Thanks! You should see it printed in color on heavy-weight glossy stock - it's really something to behold. :D

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  5. @Chris: I can easily imagine that. > big thumbs-up <

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  6. Both of those are gorgeous. What combination of software and techniques did you use? It took a minute of staring, but I can at least see how you used "stamps" or a lot of cloning in both, and yet the repetition isn't obvious in the overall look of the mountains or forests.

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  7. @d7: On both maps, the mountains and forests are hand-drawn and scanned into Photoshop. I started with a small base cluster (the "stamp"), and then duplicated that layer and placed/edited the new layer as needed/desired. (Repeat as necessary.) It's a bit more tedious than using textures, brushes or other similar repetition tools/techniques, but - as you see - it makes things a bit less uniform.

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  8. Oh, and by the way? It really is a great looking map.

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